Czech Cuisine - Giant Trout and Salmon Chlebíček

Giant Trout and Salmon Chlebíček

In Czech Republic, a chlebíček is just an open-faced sandwich. More often than not, what you’ll see is whole plates of assorted obložené chlebíčky (literally, garnished little breads), which give amateur cooks the opportunity to showcase their aesthetic leanings on little slices of bread, with complete disregard for practicality. Cured meat, cured fish, cheese, vegetables, herbs, pickles, egg, […]

read
Czech Food - Svickova

Svíčková Na Smetaně, Czech Republic’s National Dish

Svíčková, which you might remember from my review of Bohemian Spirit Restaurant, is a curious dish. Take its name, for example. The recipe’s full name in Czech is svíčková na smetaně, meaning tenderloin with cream. Literally, svíčková means little candle, and is used to designate the tenderloin — because of its shape. Obviously. But in many cases, […]

read
Czech Republic - Žufánek Distillery

Czech Impressions: Absinthe, Part 3

Let’s continue our visit of Moravian absinthe distilleries and head to Boršice. What, you aren’t familiar with Boršice? Population 2,255, firmly anchored in the middle of nowhere, a one-hour drive from Brno? Brno, which you may know from the cult Czech film, Boredom in Brno? Well, you should be, because it’s the home of the Žufánek […]

read
Czech Republic - U Zeleného Stromu Distillery

Czech Impressions: Absinthe, Part 2

Search for lists of the world’s oldest distilleries still in operation, and you’ll see a few names coming back over and over. Of course, several Scottish whiskies go back to the late 18th century. Buffalo Trace in Kentucky, dating from 1775, is America’s oldest. Further south, Jose Cuervo was first granted a permit to produce tequila in Jalisco, Mexico in […]

read
Czech Absinth

Czech Impressions: Absinthe, Part 1

Absinthe in Czech Republic, really? Yes! Unbeknownst to most, the country has a substantial and long-standing absinthe tradition. This shouldn’t be all that surprising, considering Central Europe’s taste for funky herbal liqueurs (recall, for example, Becherovka). There is evidence that absinthe was produced in Czech Republic as early as the second half of the 19th century, […]

read
Back From Central Europe

Back from Central Europe

The past 10 days saw me traveling in Hungary, Slovakia, and Czech Republic. Soon, you too will learn everything there is to know about absinthe in Moravia. Discover the little stinky cheese of Olomouc. Read the highlights of a tasting of 100 wines. Understand what real Slovak Bryndzové Halušky taste like. Find out why a church in […]

read
Stuffed Wild Pheasant with Morel Coulis and Spring Vegetables

Stuffed Wild Pheasant with Morel Coulis and Spring Vegetables

So, I decided to skip the spring turkey hunt this year. Not because of my mixed success at shooting birds with brains the size of peas, as some ill-spirited mockers might say, but because I’m actually not all that thrilled by the possibilities that their meat offers in the kitchen. The taste of wild turkey, while certainly more […]

read
Moravian Trout Rillettes and Tartare

Moravian Trout Tartare and Rillettes

True story: A couple weekends ago, I went fishing in rural Moravia. I caught a trout, picked up a bottle of Riesling from a nearby vineyard, came up with this recipe, inspired by local specialties, and got back home on Sunday night. Still, no jet lag, and no need to break the bank — I wasn’t in the Moravian […]

read

Vepřo-Knedlo-Zelo, a Czech Classic with a Twist

Vepřo-knedlo-zelo — literally “pork-dumpling-cabbage” — is Czech Republic’s national dish, but you’ve probably never heard of it. Maybe because the dish name contains one of the most difficult to pronounce letters known to mankind (the ř, affectionately called a raised alveolar non-sonorant trill in linguistics circles, is apparently shared only with the Kobon language of Papua New Guinea).  Or it could […]

read

Venison Goulash and Potato Varenyky

With this recipe, I’m killing two old Eastern European birds with one stone. The combination isn’t just a gimmick, though; the two dishes actually work really well together! The venison goulash uses one of the forelegs of the deer I killed last season. This is not a Hungarian gulyás, but rather the kind of winter […]

read
Page 1 of 212