Croatian Cuisine - Dalmatian Kremšnita

Dalmatian Kremšnita, a Twist on Croatia’s Favorite Dessert

Several years ago, I blogged my very first Croatian dessert, the Dalmatian fritters, little balls of fried dough coated in flavored confectioner’s sugar. That’s not, however, the sweet dish you’ll come across the most in Croatia. Instead, based on my scientific survey using a representative sample of 1 person, the title of Croatia’s favorite dessert should go […]

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Vis Island Pogača, or Dalmatia’s Insular Rivalry

The island of Vis, the farthest inhabited off the Dalmatian coast, has long been known for its fishing and its fishermen. Some go so far as to claim that the inventions of these fishermen changed the world. The first fish cannery on the Mediterranean was set right in Komiža, the island’s second largest settlement. In the early 20th […]

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Jewish-Polish Food - Bialys

Bialys, Bialystok’s Lost Onion Rolls

Everybody knows what a bagel is, but what about a bialy? “It’s like a bagel without a hole,” will say people who’ve had one. And these people have a point: bialys are generally sold in bagel shops, they’re good vehicles for cream cheese, they’re round, and their centers aren’t hollow. Both bialys and bagels come from […]

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Georgian Food - Gurian Khachapuri

Gurian Khachapuri, the Unsung Georgian Cheese Bread

When I blogged about the cheese debauchery that’s the Mingrelian khachapuri, some may have thought (hoped?) that I was finally putting the khachapuri topic to rest, having now covered the most popular variations at great length. Big mistake: the subject is far from being exhausted. So I hope you like cheese, because there are gonna be more […]

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Georgian Cuisine - Mingrelian Khachapuri

Mingrelian Khachapuri, Georgia’s Double Cheese Bread

While Blini and Oladi, Russian Pancakes remains the most visited post on this blog, things are slowly changing. The top post for the past few months has been the Imeretian Khachapuri, followed by the Lángos (another greasy bread!) and the exotic Tajik Qurutob. So in the continued spirit of giving people more of what they want, I’m happy to bring you another […]

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Nesselrode, Part 2: the Restaurateur, the Old-Timers, and their Pie

You might remember the story of the Nesselrode Pudding; or, how Paris’ best pastry chef created a dessert for the Russian occupants while working for that turncoat Talleyrand. But perhaps your senile great-grandparents have fondly reminisced about a popular dessert of their New York youth, a symbol of a bygone era, in a slightly different format: the Nesselrode […]

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Georgian Food - Imeretian Khachapuri

Imeretian Khachapuri, or Simple Georgian Cheese Bread

I’ve written countless times about khachapuri. This cheese bread is featured in each of my Georgian restaurant reviews at least once, if not more, and it appears on the menus of many Russian restaurants too. I’ve posted my Adjaran version, but I’ve never posted an Imeretian khachapuri, the simplest kind, which consists of a round bread stuffed […]

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Dushanbe - Shaftoluzor Restaurant - Qurtob

Qurutob, Tajikistan’s National Dish

Tajikistan claims mainly two national dishes: plov (aka osh), and qurutob. While plov is more famous and is also the national dish of neighboring Uzbekistan, qurutob, a mix of bread and onions in a yogurt sauce (with the occasional extra meat and vegetables), is specifically Tajik. Tajik culinary literature is pretty scarce. Pan-Soviet cookbooks typically […]

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Hungarian Food - Lángos

Lángos, Hungarian Deep-Fried Flat Bread

In Hungary, whether you’re at the market, at the train station, on the beach or just walking down a commercial street, sooner or later you will smell the bewitching greasy invitation of the lángos, the ubiquitous Hungarian deep-fried flat bread. You might even encounter this fat-soaked snack in neighboring countries like Austria, Germany, Czech Republic, […]

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