Hungarian Lamb Wellington, Galuska and Lecsó

Cumanian Lamb Wellington, Galuska and Lecsó

Every year around Easter, I invariably muse that it would be nice to post an Eastern European lamb recipe on these pages, and then realize that lamb isn’t really eaten with any regularity in that part of the world. Lucky for me, there are a few exceptions in regions with a Muslim population, in the […]

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Czech Food - Vánočka

Vánočka, Czech Christmas Bread

Many Europeans countries share the tradition of preparing a kind of sweet bread, often with dried fruits, for religious holidays. Germany has Stollen and Italy eats panettone, while Russia makes kulich and Poland and Ukraine bake babka. In Czech Republic (and Slovakia), there’s vánočka, a rich plaited bread served for Christmas (vánoce means Christmas in Czech). A […]

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Czech Cuisine - Finger Lakes Duck, Plum Sauce and Brussels Sprouts

Moravian Duck, Plum Sauce and Brussels Sprouts

Duck hunting season is just starting here in New York State, which is rather hard to imagine considering that we’re still running the air conditioners to fight off seemingly never-ending summer temperatures. Did the ducks really start migrating south when it’s just as warm now in October as it was in August? I’ll find out […]

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Czech Cuisine - Giant Trout and Salmon Chlebíček

Giant Trout and Salmon Chlebíček

In Czech Republic, a chlebíček is just an open-faced sandwich. More often than not, what you’ll see is whole plates of assorted obložené chlebíčky (literally, garnished little breads), which give amateur cooks the opportunity to showcase their aesthetic leanings on little slices of bread, with complete disregard for practicality. Cured meat, cured fish, cheese, vegetables, herbs, pickles, egg, […]

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Czech Food - Svickova

Svíčková Na Smetaně, Czech Republic’s National Dish

Svíčková, which you might remember from my review of Bohemian Spirit Restaurant, is a curious dish. Take its name, for example. The recipe’s full name in Czech is svíčková na smetaně, meaning tenderloin with cream. Literally, svíčková means little candle, and is used to designate the tenderloin — because of its shape. Obviously. But in many cases, […]

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Eastern European Food - Stuffed Capon with Butternut Squash Paprikas and Chanterelles

Stuffed Capon with Butternut Squash Paprikás and Chanterelles

A long, long time ago, back in 2012, Daniel Humm’s roast chicken for two at the NoMad was all the rage in foodie circles, “talked about more avidly and incessantly than any other new restaurant offering in town” according to The New York Times. All of a sudden, the most boring protein of the restaurant […]

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Hungarian Food - Somlói Galuska

Somlói Galuska, Hungarian Dessert Dumplings

You’ve probably never heard of Somlói galuska, and yet it is one of the Magyars’ favorite desserts. For some unfathomable reason, it doesn’t even appear on the menu at André’s Café. The name translates as “Somló dumpling” in English, Somló being a town near Lake Balaton, famous (moderately) for its hill and its wine. Calling […]

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Slovak Food - Bryndzové Halušky

Bryndzové Halušky, Slovakia’s National Dish

Bryndzové halušky can be called Slovakia’s national dish without too much debate. This dish of potato spaetzle/gnocchi topped with a sheep’s milk cheese sauce and fried bacon is available in every other Slovak restaurant, if not more. Halušky have their own songs (I’ll let you google them) and their very own festival, Halušky Fest in Turecká. The latter starts in […]

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Duck Breast And Meatballs, Potato Croquettes, Caramelized Onions. and Red Cabbage Purée

Central European Wild Duck, with its Potatoes and Red Cabbage

There are few places where duck is as ubiquitous a culinary staple as in Central Europe, in particular Germany, Hungary, Czech Republic, and Slovakia (the other places would be France, China, and Southeast Asia). Roast duck, served with potatoes and red cabbage, seems to be on the menu of every other restaurant, prepared this or […]

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Czech Cuisine - Doma Na Rohu

Restaurant Review: Doma Na Rohu

A note about my restaurant reviews: New York City counts many Eastern European restaurants scattered across the five boroughs, most of them ignored by restaurant critics and diners alike. I intend to visit as many as I can and report! Save for a handful of Austrian and German joints, Central European cuisine has become pretty scarce […]

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